back-home.png
ES
home-eng.png
back-yellow.jpg
back-gray.jpg

A large majority of testicular cancer cases
are detected by the patient themselves.

It’s important to see your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms:

- Painless lump or swelling on either testicle.
- Change in the way a testicle feels or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum.
- Dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin.
- Sudden buildup of fluid in the scrotum.
- Pain or discomfort, with or without swelling, in a testicle or the scrotum.

back-yellow-1.gif

How to perform a testicular self-examination in 3 easy steps.

 
paso-01.gif
paso-01-tit-eng.png

Best done after a warm shower or bath, examine each testicle with both hands. Place your index and middle fingers under the testicle with the thumbs placed on top. Firm but gently roll the testicle between your thumbs and fingers to feel for any irregularities on the surface or texture of the testicle.

 

Find the epidermis, a soft rope-like structure on the back of the testicle. If you are familiar with this structure, you won´t mistake it for a suspicious lump. Repeat the full examination on each testicle. 

paso-02.gif
 
paso-03.png
paso-03-tit-eng.png

If you notice any changes or irregularities, ache in the lower abdomen or groin, or pain in the testicles, then tell your doctor immediately.

back-gray.jpg
 

Remember that a self-examination is only one
form of detecting testicular cancer.

If you are between 15 to 35 years of age,
talk to your doctor.

 
back-yellow.jpg

Get to Know "EL pibe"

The Latin American football legend from the 90s talks about his time playing in Spain
and his role on the Colombian national team. He also explains his famous testicular incident in more detail.

 
 
back-yellow.jpg
 

In collaboration with: